AP Seminar Syllabus

 

AP Seminar

“Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.”

- Stephen Hawking

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Course Description

AP Capstone Seminar is an inquiry-based course exposing students to cross-curricular discussions, allowing them to explore real-world topics and issues by considering multiple perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students will read and analyze a wide variety of communication media including: articles, research studies, philosophical texts, speeches, broadcasts, artistic works, and performances. This assortment of sources will provide the opportunity to gain an appreciation and understanding of issues as students collaboratively and independently analyze and evaluate the evidence to consider options, alternatives, solutions, or resolutions to real-world or academic problems. Students will synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own ideas and perspectives communicated through evidence-based arguments, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team.

 

Goals

    Engage students with rigorous college-level curricula focused on the core academic skills necessary for successful college completion.

    Extend students’ abilities to synthesize information from multiple perspectives and apply skills in cross-curricular contexts and in new situations.

    Empower students to collect and analyze information with accuracy and precision.

    Cultivate students’ abilities to craft, communicate, and defend evidence-based arguments.

    Provide opportunities for students to practice disciplined and scholarly research skills applied to relevant topics of their interest and curiosity.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes

AP Capstone Seminar provides a platform for students to develop, practice, and communicate both critical and creative thinking skills as they make connections between issues and their own lives. While helping students to develop and strengthen these skills, students will learn to consider multiple points of view to develop their own ideas and perspectives on complex issues and topics through inquiry and investigation.

As the AP Program engages students in college-level work, the AP Seminar course may include perspectives that could be considered controversial, including references to ethnicity, nationality, religion, politics, race, dialect, sexuality, gender, or class. AP Seminar requires students to have the level of maturity and skill to thoughtfully consider and analyze diverse perspectives. The inclusion of topics, readings, texts, and other source material is not intended as an endorsement by the College Board of the content, ideas, or values expressed in the material.

 

Course Curriculum

College Board Requirements

Skills Development through Inquiry Units

College Board Assessments

Big Idea 1: Questions & Explore

 

Big Idea 2: Understand & Analyze  

                   Arguments

 

Big Idea 3: Evaluate Multiple

                   Perspectives

 

Big Idea 4: Synthesize Ideas

 

Big Idea 5: Team, Transform, &

                   Transmit

 

Unit 1: Arguments- Culture

 

Unit 2: Writing an Argument- Theory Introducing P.T. 2

Unit 3: Writing an Individual Research Report: Perspectives TASK 1: Team Project & Presentation

 

 

 

Unit 4:
Performance Task 1

 

Unit 5:

Performance Task 2

 

Unit 6:

EOC Exam: May 7, 2019

 

Plagiarism Policy

AP Capstone Plagiarism Policy as Defined by College Board:

 

Participating teachers shall inform students of the consequences of plagiarism and instruct students to ethically use and acknowledge the ideas and works of others throughout their course work.  The student’s individual voice should be clearly evident, and the ideas of others must be acknowledged, attributed, and/or cited.

 

A student who fails to acknowledge the source or author of any and all information or evidence taken from the work of someone else through citation, attribution or reference in the body of the work, or through a bibliographic entry, will receive a score of 0 on that particular component of the AP Seminar and/or AP Research Performance Task. In AP Seminar, a team of students that fails to properly acknowledge sources or authors on the Team Multimedia Presentation will receive a group score of 0 for that component of the Team Project and Presentation.

 

A student who incorporates falsified or fabricated information (e.g. evidence, data, sources, and/or authors) will receive a score of 0 on that particular component of the AP Seminar and/or AP Research Performance Task.  In AP Seminar, a team of students that incorporates falsified or fabricated information in the Team Multimedia Presentation will receive a group score of 0 for that component of the Team Project and Presentation.

 

 

Instructional Resources

In order to meet the course objectives, current media, magazines, journals, newspapers, and other secondary and primary sources will be incorporated

Instruction and supplemental readings may also come from, but are not limited to,  the following texts:

 

     Ballenger, Bruce.  The Curious Researcher: A Guide to Writing Research Papers, 8th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2014.

     Burke, Jim. Uncharted Territory: A High School Reader. New York, W.W. Norton & Company, 2016.

     Chaffee, John, and Susan Carlson. Critical Thinking, Thoughtful Writing: A Rhetoric with Readings. Stamford, CT:

          Cengage Learning, 2015.

 

     Jacobus, Lee A. A World of Ideas: Essential Readings for College Writers. Boston: Bedford, 2013.

     Palmquist, Mike. The Bedford Researcher. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martins, 2015. Print.

 

   

 

Expectations for Academic Success

    Respect yourself, others, and materials.

    Arrive to class on time and be prepared to work.

    Stay current with reading assignments.

    Actively participate in class discussions.

    Maintain good communication with your team and teacher.

    Actively engage with our Google Classroom and the College Board electronic student portfolio site.

    Students are expected to follow all district, campus, and classroom rules and procedures.

 

 

Course Evaluation and Grading

This course will require students to complete a number of tasks in preparation for the AP Capstone Seminar formal assessments. Students are expected to thoroughly and thoughtfully complete all work assigned in this course, regardless of whether the assignment receives a grade. Students MUST regularly attend class prepared to participate actively in discussions, both online and in class!

We will use the following grading criteria in gradebook:                 

Major Grades:           60%

Minor Grades:          40%

The Spring semester focuses primarily on the AP exam tasks.  These tasks are part of the AP exam and cannot be used for an in-class grade. These tasks will be included in your semester grade as an on-time assignment grade only. 

Late Policy: Success in this class is highly correlated to meeting deadlines.  Although no late work should be accepted as this is a college-level course, we understand that high school students are still developing academic habits.  Grades in this course will reflect on-time submission.  Assignments turned in late will follow the district policy for AP Courses.

Semester 1

Unit 1: End of Course Exam;Part A and B

Unit 2: Review PT 2

Unit 3: Review PT 1

Semester 2

Unit 4: PT 1  

Unit 5: PT 2  

Unit 6: EOC Exam  April 26 - May , 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 1:  Culture & Society

Weeks 1-5 (August 27 - September 28, 2018)

 

Focus Learning Objectives: 
1.2A, 1.3A, 1.4A, 2.1A, 2.1B, 2.2A, 2.2B, 2.2C, 3.1A, 4.1A, 4.2A, 4.2B, 4.3A, 5.1A, 5.1B, 5.2A

LO 1.2A – Retrieving, questioning, organizing, and using prior knowledge about a topic.

LO 1.3A – Accessing and managing information using effective strategies.

LO 1.4A – Evaluating the relevance and credibility of the source of information and data in relation to the inquiry.

LO 2.1A – Employing appropriate reading strategies and reading critically for a specific purpose.

LO 2.1B – Summarizing and explaining a text’s main idea or aim while avoiding faulty generalizations and oversimplification.

LO 2.2A – Explaining and analyzing the logic and line of reasoning of an argument.

LO 2.2B – Evaluating the relevance and credibility of evidence used to support an argument, taking context into consideration.

LO 2.2C – Evaluating the validity of an argument

LO 3.1A – Identifying, comparing, and interpreting multiple perspectives on or arguments about an issue.

LO 4.1A – Formulating a well-reasoned argument, taking the complexities of the program or issues into consideration.

LO 4.2A – Interpreting, using, and synthesizing qualitative and/or quantitative data/information from various perspectives and sources (e.g., primary, secondary, print, non-print) to develop and support an argument.

LO 4.2B – Providing insightful and cogent commentary that links evidence with claims

LO 4.3A – Attributing knowledge and ideas accurately and ethically, using an appropriate citation style.

LO 5.1A – Planning, producing, and presenting a cohesive argument, considering audience, context, and purpose.

LO 5.1B – Adhering to established conventions of grammar, usage, style, and mechanics.

LO 5.2A – Providing individual contributions to overall collaborative effort to accomplish a task or goal.

Learning Activities

        Shared inquiry

        Multiple lens practice 

        Argument mapping/evaluation

        Group jigsaw/presentation

        Plus/delta team reflection + solutions

        Source evaluations

        Logical Fallacy presentations

        Evaluating Sources Assessment

        Team Slide Show/PowerPoint

        Team Presentations

        Mock AP End of Year Exam

        Part A- Question 1

        Part A- Question 2

Unit Resources

        Annenberg Public Policy Center. (2013, September 19). Monty Python and the quest for the perfect fallacy. Retrieved September 26, 2016, from Annenberg Classroom website: http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/page/monty-python-and-the-quest-for-the-perfect-fallacy

        Bresee, P. (2016, February 3). A plague of plastic bags. Retrieved September 27, 2016, from Grid Magazine website: http://www.gridphilly.com/grid-magazine/2016/2/25/recycling-guest-editorial

        Hamermesh, D. (2011, October 27). On the job, beauty is more than skin-deep (Interview by S. Shellenbarger) [Transcript]. Retrieved September 26, 2016, from Wall Street Journal website: http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052970203687504576655331418204842

        Heffernan, V. (2011, January 9). Against headphones. New York Times Magazine, MM16. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/09/magazine/09FOB-medium-t.html?_r=0

        Jin, D. (1449). Dense green covering the spring mountains [Ink on paper]. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/asset/dense-green-covering-the-spring-mountains-%E6%98%A5%E5%B1%B1%E7%A9%8D%E7%BF%A0%E5%9C%96/3wFt5lei5mjlSw (ARTISTIC WORK)

 

        Maddox, B. (2007, June 1). Blinded by science; The math behind beauty. Discover, 20. Retrieved from http://discovermagazine.com/2007/jun/blinded-by-science

        Martinez, M. (2012, September 29). Iran’s news agency portrays satirical Onion story as its own [Newsgroup post]. Retrieved from CNN website: http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/28/world/iran-news-agency-duped/

        Miner, H. (1956). Body ritual among the Nacirema. American Anthropologist, 58(3), 503-507. Retrieved from JSTOR database.

        Nybord, K. (2003). The impact of public policy on social and moral norms: Some examples. Journal of Consumer Policy, 25(3), 259-277. http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1025622223207

        Salinas, B. (Writer). (2012, December 1). Beauty pageant economics: The sash isn’t cheap [Radio episode transcript]. In All Things Considered. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/2012/12/01/166256500/beauty-pageant-economics-the-sash-isnt-cheap

        Team Coco. (2013, September 20). Louis C.K. hates cell phones [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/5HbYScltf1c

        Why young people don’t vote [Blog post]. (2014, October 29). Retrieved from The Economist explains website: http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/10/economist-explains-24

 

Unit 1 Summative Assessment: Mock AP Seminar End of Course - Parts A and B

Unit 2:  Theory

Weeks 6-10 (October 1 - November 2, 2018)

 

Focus Learning Objectives: 
All prior learning objectives, in addition to 1.1A, 1.1B, 1.5A, 2.3A, 2.3B, 3.2A, 4.4A, 4.5A, 5.1E, 5.2B, 5.3A, 5.3B

LO 1.1A – Contextualizing and identifying the complexities of a problem or issue.

LO 1.1B – Posing complex questions and seeking out answers that reflect multiple, divergent, or contradictory perspectives.

LO 1.5A – Identifying the information needed for the context of the inquiry.

LO 2.3A – Connecting an argument to broader issues by examining the implications of the author’s claim.

LO 2.3B – Evaluating potential resolutions, conclusions, or solutions to problems or issues raised by an argument.

LO 3.2A – Evaluating objections, implications, and limitations of alternate, opposing, or competing perspectives or arguments

LO 4.4A – Extending an idea, question, process, or product to innovate or create new understandings.

LO 4.5A – Offering resolutions, conclusions, and/or solutions based on evidence as well as considering consequences and implications.

LO 5.1E – Engaging an audience by employing effective techniques of delivery or performance.

LO 5.2B – Fostering constructive team climate, resolving conflicts, and facilitating the contributions of all team members to address complex, open-ended problems

LO 5.3A – Reflecting on and revising their own writing, thinking, and creative processes.

LO 5.3B – Reflecting on experiences of collaborative effort

Learning Activities

        Brainstorming activities

        Plagiarism tutorial

        Research question evaluations

        Data mining practice

        Citing sources assignment

        Annotated bibliography

        Lens/perspective analysis

        Drafting workshop/conferencing

        Team building

        Team plus/delta reflection + solutions

        Team debriefing (includes teacher & student team feedback)

        Plagiarism Assessment

        800 word paper on team selected topic using multiple lenses 

        Team Slide Show/PowerPoint 

        Team Presentation (6-8 min) with 1 question per student defense

        Mock AP End of Year Exam

        Part A- Question 3

Unit Resources

        All about plagiarism. (2014, July 8). Retrieved September 26, 2016, from University of Texas website: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/services/instruction/learningmodules/plagiarism/index.html

        Argument [Handout]. (2014). Retrieved September 27, 2016, from The Writing Center at UNC-Chapel Hill website: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/

        Bohannon, J., Kock, D., Homm, P., & Driehaus, A. (2015). Chocolate with high cocoa content as a weight-loss accelerator. International Archives of Medicine. Retrieved from http://imed.pub/ojs/index.php/iam/article/view/1087/728

        Ekstrom, A. (2015, January). Andreas Ekstrom: The moral bias behind your search results [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/andreas_ekstrom_the_moral_bias_behind_your_search_results?language=en (SPEECH/BROADCAST)

        Durkheim, E. (2014). The division of labor in society (Free Press Trade Paperback edition. ed.). New York: Free Press. (PHILOSOPHICAL TEXT)

        Giambrone, A. (2014, October 15). Drinking coffee, for your health [Blog post]. Retrieved from Health website: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/10/drinking-coffee-for-your-health/381459/

        Gladwell, M. (2004, September 6). The ketchup conundrum. New Yorker, 80(25), 129-135. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database. (ARTICLE)

        Godoy, M. (2013, November 22). This is what America’s school lunches really look like [Blog post]. Retrieved from The Salt website: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/11/20/246400702/this-is-what-america-s-school-lunches-really-look-like

        Langston, C. A. (n.d.). How to use rhetoric to get what you want - Camille A. Langston (A. Gendler, Ed.). Retrieved September 27, 2016, from TED EDLessons Worth Sharing website: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-use-rhetoric-to-get-what-you-want-camille-a-langston#review

        Milbers, K. (2012). Food of the gods: The role of chocolate in cardiovascular health. UBC Medical Journal, 3(2), 19-22. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database. (RESEARCH STUDY)

        Tritch, T. (2015, February 19). The ball and chain of student debt [Editorial]. Retrieved September 26, 2016, from New York Times website: http://takingnote.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/19/the-ball-and-chain-of-student-debt/?_r=0

        Sugar industry manipulated research about health effects, study finds [Radio episode transcript]. (2016, September 13). In All Things Considered. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=493801090

        Plagiarism. (2016, September 6). Retrieved September 27, 2016, from San Jose University Libguides website: http://libguides.sjsu.edu/plagiarism

 

Unit 2 Summative Assessment:

Mock Performance Task 2 - Individual Written Argument & Individual Multimedia Presentation                                                                         

 

 

 

 

Unit 3:  Perspectives

Weeks 11-15 (November 5 - December 14, 2018)                 
extra weeks  Thanksgiving Break (November 19 - 23, 2018)

                        Semester Exams (December 17 - 21, 2018)    

                        Winter Break (December 24, 2018 - January 8, 2019)         

Focus Learning Objectives:  all learning objectives covered

LO 1.1A – Contextualizing and identifying the complexities of a problem or issue.

LO 1.1B – Posing complex questions and seeking out answers that reflect multiple, divergent, or contradictory perspectives.

LO 1.2A – Retrieving, questioning, organizing, and using prior knowledge about a topic.

LO 1.3A – Accessing and managing information using effective strategies.

LO 1.3A – Accessing and managing information using effective strategies.

LO 1.4A – Evaluating the relevance and credibility of the source of information and data in relation to the inquiry.

LO 1.4A – Evaluating the relevance and credibility of the source of information and data in relation to the inquiry.

LO 2.1A – Employing appropriate reading strategies and reading critically for a specific purpose.

LO 2.1B – Summarizing and explaining a text’s main idea or aim while avoiding faulty generalizations and oversimplification.

LO 2.2A – Explaining and analyzing the logic and line of reasoning of an argument.

LO 2.2B – Evaluating the relevance and credibility of evidence used to support an argument, taking context into consideration.

LO 2.2C – Evaluating the validity of an argument.

LO 2.3A – Connecting an argument to broader issues by examining the implications of the author’s claim.

LO 2.3B – Evaluating potential resolutions, conclusions, or solutions to problems or issues raised by an argument.

LO 3.1A – Identifying, comparing, and interpreting multiple perspectives on or arguments about an issue.

LO 3.2A – Evaluating objections, implications, and limitations of alternate, opposing, or competing perspectives or arguments.

LO 4.1A – Formulating a well-reasoned argument, taking the complexities of the program or issues into consideration.

LO 4.2A – Interpreting, using, and synthesizing qualitative and/or quantitative data/information from various perspectives and sources (e.g., primary, secondary, print, non-print) to develop and support an argument.

LO 4.2B – Providing insightful and cogent commentary that links evidence with claims.

LO 4.3A – Attributing knowledge and ideas accurately and ethically, using an appropriate citation style.

LO 4.4A – Extending an idea, question, process, or product to innovate or create new understandings.

LO 4.5A – Offering resolutions, conclusions, and/or solutions based on evidence as well as considering consequences and implications.

LO 5.1A – Planning, producing, and presenting a cohesive argument, considering audience, context, and purpose,

LO 5.1A – Planning, producing, and presenting a cohesive argument, considering audience, context, and purpose.

LO 5.1B – Adhering to established conventions of grammar, usage, style, and mechanics.

LO 5.1C – Communicating information through appropriate media using effective techniques of design.

LO 5.1D – Adapting an argument for context, purpose, and/or audience.

LO 5.1E – Engaging an audience by employing effective techniques of delivery or performance.

LO 5.2A – Providing individual contributions to overall collaborative effort to accomplish a task or goal.

LO 5.2B – Fostering constructive team climate, resolving conflicts, and facilitating the contributions of all team members to address complex, open-ended problems.

LO 5.3A – Reflecting on and revising their own writing, thinking, and creative processes.

LO 5.3B – Reflecting on experiences of collaborative effort.

Learning Activities

        Timed Synthesis Writing: 3 viewpoints 

        Finding Premises and Conclusions

        Personal Research Reflection Survey

        Annotated bibliography

        Lens/perspective analysis

        Art scavenger hunt

        Drafting workshop/conferencing including peer editing

        Plus/delta reflection + solutions

        Mock AP End of Year Exam

        Part B

        1,000 word individual paper on a self-selected, current event related, issue 

        Individual Slide Show/PowerPoint 

        Individual Presentation & 2 question defense

Unit Resources

        Billari, F. C., & Liefbroer, A. C. (2007). Should I stay or should I go? The impact of age norms on leaving home. Demography, 44(1), 181-198. Retrieved from JSTOR database.

        Brown, A. C., & Mahoney, K. M. (2009, April 17). Ethics! Ethics! Read Argument [Handout]. (2014). Retrieved September 27, 2016, from The Writing Center at UNC-Chapel Hill website: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/

        All about it! [Blog post]. Retrieved from The Learning Network website: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/17/ethics-ethics-read-all-about-it/?_r=2

        Deboer, F. (2015, June 26). It’s time to legalize polygamy. Retrieved September 27, 2016, from PoliticoMagazine website: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/06/gay-marriage-decision-polygamy-119469?o=1

        Frazier, I. (2016, August 8). Outdone. The New Yorker, 33.

        Glinski, N. (2014, July 8). Tiny houses big with U.S. owners seeking economic freedom. Retrieved September 27, 2016, from Bloomberg website: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2014-07-09/tiny-houses-big-with-u-s-owners-seeking-economic-freedom

        Lange, D. (1936). Migrant Mother [Photograph]. Retrieved from http://100photos.time.com/photos/dorothea-lange-migrant-mother

        Lindsey, B. (2012, October 11). The real problem with helicopter parents: There aren’t enough of them. Retrieved July 22, 2016, from The Atlantic website: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/10/the-real-problem-with-helicopter-parents-there-arent-enough-of-them/263410/

        Mashal, M. (2016, July 19). Child marriage at issue as an Afghan bride dies. New York Times, sec. L, p. A7. Retrieved from Academic OneFile database.

        Robertson, S. (2002). Age of consent law and making modern childhood in New York City, 1886-1921. Journal of Social History, 35(4), 781+. Retrieved from Opposing Viewpoints in Context database.

        Skenazy, L. (2016). The criminalization of parenthood: Why are good parents being charged with child neglect? Retrieved September 27, 2016, from Reader’s Digest website: http://www.rd.com/culture/free-range-parenting-child-neglect/

        Warden, J. (2016, July 21). Child “bride’? No, a slave [Editorial]. New York Times, sec. L, p. A22. Retrieved from Academic OneFile database.

        Westhale, J. (2015, November 23). The trouble trendiness of poverty appropriation [Blog post]. Retrieved from The Establishment website: http://www.theestablishment.co/2015/11/23/tiny-home-houses-poverty-appropriation/

 

Unit 3 Summative Assessment:

Mock Performance Task 1 - Individual Research Report & Team Multimedia Presentation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 4:  Performance Task 1

 Individual Research Report and Team Multimedia Presentation

Weeks 21- 24 (January 9 - February 26, 2019)

 

Individual Work on Team Project

• Questioning

• Research

• Arguments

• Lens

• Refining research

• Connecting evidence to reason

• Developing line of reasoning

• Finalizing format: Spelling, bibliography, etc.

Individual Research Report Due

Team Work on Team Project

• Development of team report

• Developing a group line of reasoning

• Connecting arguments to each other

 

Group Paper and Presentation Due

Team Presentations

Due February 26,2019

 

Unit 5:  Performance Task 2

Individual Research-Based Essay & Presentation

Weeks 25- 34 (February 27 - April 25, 2019)

Individual Work on Individual Research-Based Essay

• Questioning

• Research

• Arguments

• Lens

• Refining research

• Connecting evidence to reason

• Developing line of reasoning

• Finalizing format: Spelling, bibliography, etc.

Due April 25, 2019.

UNIT 6: End-of-Course Exam Prep & Capstone Research Preparation

Weeks 35- 26 (April 26 - May 31, 2019)

Exam May 7, 2019